Rebecca

SONY DSC

  1. What is your position in the magazine and what does it involve?

I am the founder, Editor-in-Chief and creative director; I basically do everything.

  1. How did you come up with SUBCULTURED?

I did previous work and that was kind of a natural next step for me; I did internships and gained a lot of fashion experience, so everything I did beforehand led me to where I am today. I always loved magazines, I was interested in the pictures, I liked reading them; in my family, we read a lot of newspapers and magazines, it’s very media-focused, so the idea came naturally to me.

  1. What are the best and worst parts of your role?

It is a unique opportunity! I’ve met a lot of people, done a lot of things that a typical university student wouldn’t yet. SUBCULTURED really gives me a chance to be creative and just do something fun, outside of exams and essays.

People management can be a challenge; having to direct someone to execute your vision and communicate that effectively can be difficult. The amount of work it takes is not easy either, but I think it’s definitely worth it.

SONY DSC

  1. What do you think the most important qualities of a #girlboss are?

You gotta be quite strong-minded and able to look after yourself as well as doing all the work; you need take a break here and there. Additionally, you need to be able to handle people and different situations, react in a calm way to crises. But also get on with people, be a good listener and make sure you are open to other people’s ideas instead of bossing everyone around; it’s a two-way thing.

  1. Who are you favourite #girlbosses?

Sophia Amoruso, who is the founder of Nasty Gal and who wrote the book #girlboss, which is the concept of our shoot. But also Anna Wintour and Grace Coddington.

  1. What advice would you give other people?

You have to be passionate about what you do; when you get an idea and you feel an energy, it’s like the universe is telling you something, so follow that energy, follow your instinct. Don’t be discouraged if you want to do something and others say no; persistence is key. When I first started I kept having to deal with people that would say no, but it’s just part of the journey.

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

“Be strong-minded and able to look after yourself as well as doing all the work.”

 

Alice

SONY DSC

  1. What is your position in the magazine and what does it involve?

I am the Managing Director and I oversee anything that has to do with content: the written content, the photoshoots, the design of the issues, the videography. I am also the Vice-President of the society, so, in general, I help out a lot with many aspects of running the magazine.

  1. How did you work your way to being Managing Director?

I got to know Rebecca and some of the other members of the staff when we got our society standing and from then on I just volunteered to take on more and more work, because I loved the project and the people. There came a point that I was doing a lot and Rebecca thought it was only fair to make me a director.

  1. What are the best and worst parts of your role?

I love the project itself, the creativity involved, the people, the position I have…the whole experience is definitely one of the best parts of university and I just look forward to working more for it every time. We always come up with creative, unexpected things; it’s just brilliant!

But if I had to pick things apart, I would say that, especially when you are managing something that so many people are involved in, you feel a real responsibility towards them to produce something good. There is definitely a pressure; for instance, I sometimes feel like what I am doing can always be better. Because, when you are the manager/boss, there is no limit, there is no one there to tell you: it’s ok, you can stop now, it’s good enough. So you feel like you have to keep pushing and it can be exhausting. But, thankfully, I work with talented people, who won’t give in bad work and that makes me feel so much better when I get into crisis mode!

SONY DSC

  1. What do you think the most important qualities of a #girlboss are?

Nothing substitutes working hard, especially when you love something: you have to commit and not let anything get in your way. Additionally, I would say building a good environment with the people you work with is very important.

  1. Who are you favourite #girlbosses?

I have a huge amount of respect for people like Alexandra Schulman and Anna Wintour, but my heart always belonged to J.K. Rowling. Any project she’s been involved in, she’s just delivered 100%: from the Harry Potter books to her new screenplay to her charitable work. It’s not so easy to be a girlboss in the creative industry, but she has done it and she keeps going forward with her career.

  1. What advice would you give other people?

Work hard and strive to do the best you can, but, of course, don’t forget to enjoy it!

SONY DSC

“Commit and do not let anything get in your way.”

 

Katherine

SONY DSC

  1. What is your position in the magazine and what does it involve?

I’m the Editorial Director, so I deal with all the written work in the magazine. This means I manage the writing and editing of our articles for both the website and the bi-annual magazine issue. I also help out where I can with marketing!

  1. How did you work your way to being Editorial Director?

Rebecca sent out the first mass email last year and I loved the idea of being involved with something so creative. I went along to the first meeting, thinking that writing was the thing I could probably do best, then I sent Rebecca a huge email of ideas I had and things I could do for the magazine. I had a couple of meetings with Rebecca and helped out with editing articles before I became the editorial director and I think I showed a lot of enthusiasm for the content of the mag. In general, I worked quite hard to get the role- and it paid off!

  1. What are the best and worst parts of your role?

One of the best parts is meeting new people, for example our fab team of directors, as well as some really great writers. I also love the feeling of reading an amazing article, which I know someone has put a lot of effort into. And, of course, seeing everyone’s articles when they’re published and look fancy!
I think the bits I find the most difficult are the same as any other boss/manager. I hate telling people when what they’ve written isn’t ‘on brand’ etc. or that they haven’t gotten a certain role. But it’s part of the job and all the good parts make it worth it.

SONY DSC

  1. What do you think the most important qualities of a #girlboss are?

I think important qualities are to have confidence in yourself and your decisions. Also to work really hard and go for as many opportunities as possible. But I think the most important quality is always being kind to everybody, even if you’re giving them bad news.

  1. Who are you favourite #girlbosses?

Alexandra Shulman, the Editor-in-Chief of British Vogue, definitely.

  1. What advice would you give other people?

Always be kind and work hard. Also, don’t be afraid to work hard and show that you are doing so- I feel like in university there is still that pressure not to be a ‘geek’, but doing your best and putting the hours in pays off. Finally, act confident even if you aren’t; but if you really are stuck, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

SONY DSC

“Go for as many opportunities as possible.”

 

Setareh

SONY DSC

  1. What is your position in the magazine and what does it involve?

I am the photo director for SUBCULTURED and my role involves organizing the photoshoots and developing ideas with Rebecca and Alice as to what concepts we want to shoot. On set, I take creative direction as to what kind of pictures we want.

  1. How did you work your way to being Photo Director?

When Rebecca sent out the email last year, I went along to one of the meetings and I showed an interest in the photo side of things. I think I showed the most interest out of everyone else, because, after that meeting, Rebecca asked me straight way: “Do you want to be the photo director?” and I said, “yeah, of course!”

SONY DSC

  1. What are the best and worst parts of your role?

The best part of having my role is meeting new people; I met so many new people by contacting models, photographers, make-up artists, just complete strangers. The worst part is when people let you down and you were counting on them, when people drop out last minute or when they are being difficult. I can get quite annoyed on set quite quickly; I’ve been known to shout in the past (chuckles).

  1. What do you think the most important qualities of a #girlboss are?

Leadership qualities, like knowing when to take direction, having good judgment, knowing how much risk you should take and being able to balance the options that are in front of you. You also have to be creative, look at things in a different way. As a boss, you can’t do everything other people do, you got to be different.

SONY DSC

  1. Who are you favourite #girlbosses?

I don’t really look up to anyone; there isn’t anyone that I aspire to be. I don’t look up at someone and say “wow, I want to be like that.” People look up to Beyoncé, let’s say, and she is a boss in her own way, she is a boss for herself, and you need to be a boss for you. So I am a boss for myself.

  1. What advice would you give other people?

Do the hard stuff: start from the bottom. Don’t be one of those people who have too much pride and are embarrassed to have the job lower down the hierarchy, because no one ever got to the top just by walking into that building and saying I want to be in the CEO’s office. Everyone starts from somewhere and you need to be committed to what you want, be willing to learn, to take criticism, to take on change and adapt, but still be true to who you are. You need to have that flare about you that makes you different and will put you in that boss position.

SONY DSC

“Do the hard stuff: start from the bottom.”

 

Olivia

SONY DSC

  1. What is your position in the magazine and what does it involve?

I am Marketing Director and also the Treasurer of the magazine. As marketing director, I’m in charge of all the marketing campaigns, so that means the posters you see around campus, any flyers that you see, what goes up around the Freshers Fair… also, if we do any kind of events, I am on top of that, along with the Events Director. As treasurer, I have to keep track of our budget; make sure we don’t spend too much money and that we save enough money to go into print. I am also in charge of finding advertisers, sponsorship, getting members to pay… generally, just managing the budget. On the contents side, I take care of the Boileroom reviews at the moment and of our relationship with them; in general, I contribute to the magazine as much as I can, either by writing or by taking photos.

  1. How did you work your way to being Marketing Director?

I was interested in getting involved, so I started going to meetings. Soon I became the marketing assistant and then, eventually, took over. That position had quite a bit of overlap with the position of Treasurer, so I decided to run in the AGM for that too.

  1. What are the best and worst parts of your role?

The best part is that I can do a bit of everything. I like writing about music, but also having a more “proper” role as it is; I enjoy being in charge of marketing, taking on responsibility, and that’s why I have such a big role in the magazine and contribute to many areas. In general, I have a lot of fun with it.

The worst part is chasing up people. Especially chasing up people to help me distribute posters around campus to sell tickets when no one wants to do either, so it ends up just being you doing all the work.

SONY DSC

“Never let go of that underlying passion or goal that you’ve got.”

  1. What do you think the most important qualities of a #girlboss are?

Being ambitious and never stopping for anything. If you’ve got a goal in life, there should be nothing in the world that will stand in your way. For instance, it’s true, there are not a lot of women in charge of businesses, but if you want to a businesswoman, you should for it. You shouldn’t let someone saying “oh you are a woman, you won’t be successful” stop you. You should prove people wrong. Because if you have that ambition and drive, you should never let it go.

  1. Who are you favourite #girlbosses?

Emma Watson. She’s an actress, but she’s come out of Harry Potter and she is now a UN Ambassador. I think it’s incredible what she’s doing for the UN and equality and I think it shows you can use all that fame to do something good. I can’t wait to see what other things she does as UN ambassador.

Another icon and UN ambassador is Angeline Jolie. She’s done so much hard work outside of being an actress. It just shows that there are people that can use their celebrity status for good, to inspire other people and bring awareness.

  1. What advice would you give other people?

Never let go of that passion or that goal, even if it may seem very tricky; it won’t always be tough. It’s never gonna be an easy road to achieving anything in life, but if you give up after the first hurdle, how are you gonna get anywhere that you want to be? Never let go of that underlying passion or goal that you’ve got, no matter what anyone says. Even if everyone is telling you, “You can’t do it, just give up.” If you really believe you can do it, you can.

Being organized is important too, because if you bang yourself out, you are not gonna do anything; you need to manage your time. You need to have time to do all this stuff, but also just chill out and hang out with your friends, take time out for yourself. I’ve been a victim to doing everything, having no time to myself, to the point that, I’m just not happy, because I’m doing too many things. It’s good to have time to just sit in front of the TV with a pot of ice cream and some popcorn and just watch films.

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

Text by Alice Vily

Photography and post-production by Max Cykiert

Videography by Niki.